U.S. coronavirus case count tops 400,000

Mourners stand by the casket of veteran Mary Foley in Massachusetts. The U.S. death toll has eclipsed 13,000, according to Johns Hopkins University.
Mourners stand by the casket of veteran Mary Foley in Massachusetts. The U.S. death toll has eclipsed 13,000, according to Johns Hopkins University.

The U.S. tally of confirmed coronavirus cases topped 400,000 on Wednesday, more than double any other country, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.
America has now recorded more than one-in-four COVID-19 cases on the planet, and accounts for about 15% of the global death toll, according to the figures. More than 13,000 Americans have died.
On Wednesday, Spain had the second-most cases in the world (146,690), and Italy was grappling with the third-most (135,586), according to Johns Hopkins.
Accurately assessing the scale of the virus’ spread is slippery business. The U.S. and other countries have struggled to supply tests to citizens, and China, the country where COVID-19 was first reported, has faced accusations of fudging its numbers.
The worldwide case count hit 400,000 two weeks ago. It has since climbed above 1.4 million.


3 comments:

  1. she was 93 according to the obit.

    ReplyDelete
  2. What kind of article is this? I have a few questions for you.

    1.HOw many tests would it take to confirm 400,000 cases?
    2. Where are these tests being done?
    3. I would like some PROOF of that. Not just media drivel.

    I have traveled to more than a dozen hospitals in one of the "hot spots" in our country.
    There was ONE person being tested, ER doctors told me they were not seeing any action.
    Local medical staffs are being laid off... health centers closed.

    Something SMELLS and its not dead bodies from a pandemic.

    ReplyDelete
  3. According to data obtained from the CDC's National Center for Health Statistics Mortality Surveillance System website, total U.S. deaths for the first three weeks of March are DOWN 10% from the average of the prior four years for the same three week period.

    The average for weeks 9 through 11 for the four prior years was a total of 170,555 deaths. For weeks 9 through 11 this year, the total is 153,015, meaning 17,540 fewer people died in America during the first three weeks of March than could be reasonably expected. And the gap between historic deaths and weekly deaths is widening. For week 11, just 47,655 Americans died, 8,773 and 15% fewer than the average for week 11 in the prior four years. And while data on week 12 is not complete, it is trending similar to week 11 and will likely be down by 15% (around 8,700 deaths less than expected) even though 1,919 COVID-19 deaths were reported (in week beginning 3/22).

    https://www.grassfire.com/what_total_u_s_deaths_down_10_in_march_from_prior_years_further_raising_question_of_covid_impact

    ReplyDelete

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